Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day February 2020

Narcissus ‘Rinjveld’s Early Sensation’

It’s been a strange winter so far for this Garden Bloggers report.  No real snowfall and temperatures that have fallen to 20 degrees on occasion but have mostly been well above normal, even near records for some days.  Total precipitation is about 50% above normal.  The result is that many flowers are up earlier than usual but get blasted in between glorious flowerings.  A case in point is the camellias which have had many flowers but then get browned off when the temperature dips.

Camellia japonica red

Camellia japonica ‘Pink’

On the whole we are just enjoying some our early spring flowers earlier than usual.

Adonis amurensis ‘Fukujukai’

Jeffersonia dubia

Eranthis hyemalis

The Hellebores are particularly resilient at this time of year.

Helleborus viridis

Helleborus x hybridus PDN Yellow

Helleborus x lemonnierae ‘Walberton’s Rosemary’

This is one of the nicest new hybrids.

Of course one also expects to see snowdrops at this time of year, but they are spreading nicely.

Galanthus nivalis ‘Viridapice’

Galanthus nivalis ‘Blewbury Tart’

The first full flowering in the alpine bed is the Draba hispanica.

Draba hispanica

In the greenhouse the Cyrtanthus breviflorus and mackenii are flowering.

Cyrtanthus breviflorus

And our only Geissorhiza is in flower too.

Geissorhiza inaequalis

Finally we made two trips to Gettysburg Gardens where I discovered some lovely examples of Veldtheimia bracteata.

Veldtheimia bracteata

These are magnificent plants, sometime called forest lilies, that can easily grow to 2 ft tall with long lasting flowers.

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day January 2020

Camellia japonica red

Ok, I’ve just counted and I’ve done 400 posts already.  That’s a lot of flowers no matter how I add it up.  

It’s hard not to lead off this Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day with this stunning Camellia Japonica which has been flowering since November.  It probably has 20 blooms on it at this point.  Although I expect they will get burnt off with the next hard freeze, it has been a pleasure to see this one flowering on a daily basis with the very mild winter we have had thus far.

Similarly the red Japanese quince is getting ahead of itself.

Japanese Quince

The Hellebores are less surprising.  The niger types are often in flower during any warm spell.

Helleborus niger ‘HGC Jacob’

What was a surprise was to see this new pink hybrid also in flower.

Helleborus x lemonnierae ‘Walberton’s Rosemary’

This was new acquisition from Plant Delights.  It’s been flowering for almost 2 weeks now.

The various snowdrops are up and doing what snowdrops are meant to do.

Snowdrops

The yellow witch hazel (Arnold’s Promise) is also in flower but it was too windy to get good photos today.  The Adonis are popping up and getting ready to bloom.

Adonis lined up ready to go

The biggest surprise from the outdoor flowers is this little Lewisia in the Alpine bed.

Lewisia (probably cotyledon)

In the greenhouse we have many oxalis and narcissus blooming.

Narcissus romieuxii ‘Atlas Gold’

A little more surprising is this Silene that I grew from seed obtained through the North American Rock Garden Society’s seed exchange last year.

Silene yunnanensis

It really wanted to be outside but I forgot to plant it out last year.

We made a visit to Gettysburg Gardens last weekend and I brought back a number of treasures including this ground cover

Arisarum proboscideum (also known as mouse tails)

And finally let me close with this lovely hybrid cyrtanthus that I found there.

Cyrtanthus hybrid

 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day December 2019

Camellia sasanqua hybrid

Well this GBBD posting is almost like an advertisement for camellias.  The winter has been very mild so far and not only are the fall camellias doing what they are supposed to do, but the spring camellias are getting into the act too.

Fall Camellia white

Red Fall Camellia

Red Spring Camellia starting to bloom

In addition I found this morning, for the first time, a bloom on a camellia japonica x sasanqua hybrid that we have been growing for several years.

Camellia x ‘Yume’

There aren’t a lot of other flowers out for December so the camellias really steal the show.  Here are few things I noticed.

Euphorbia still in bloom

Mahonia ‘Soft Caress’

Japanese Quince

The greenhouse has a few things to put forward besides the oxalis which continue to bloom

Freesia fucata

And the very first narcissus of the season

Narcissus catabricus ‘Silver Palace’

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day November 2019

Camellia sasanqua

Let me open this Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day post with the Fall Camellia shown above.  We’ve had a few frosts so most of the outdoor flowers are gone, but the camellias persist and will take any few days of sunshine to blossom some more buds.  There even buds on the red Fall Camellia which has not flowered for five years, ever since I cut it way back after what I mistakenly thought was a killing freeze.

Red Fall Camellia

There are only a couple of other outside plants in flower including a remnant Fall Crocus which is arriving way after its brethren.

Fall Crocus

Note to file — plant more Fall Crocus next year.

In one of the troughs that I inherited from Terry Partridge has a sedum that sends up a vertical spike that starts out white and then turns red after the frost hits it.

Sedum in trough before frost

Sedum in trough after frost

Still attractively in flower in either case.

For other flowers we need to go inside.

The Amazon Lily is flowering again which it does at least twice a year for us.

Amazon Lily

It’s been in the same pot with minimal care for decades.  We really should give it a transplant.

Another star of the show came in from the greenhouse.

Nerine undulata

I really like the Nerines in general, but this one has a particularly attractive flower that has been with us for at least 2 weeks now.

I’ve also brought in a little cyclamen that is expanding out of its current pot.

Cyclamen hederifolium ‘Perlenteppich’

The leaves are just remarkable.

Also in the greenhouse is the usual assortment of oxalis and this coloful Bulbine.

Bulbine frutescens

Finally a Moraea to round out the show.

Moraea polystachys

 

 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day October 2019

Lycoris radiata

A total surprise for Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day is this lovely Lycoris.  It started blooming last week and I almost missed it because it’s been terribly dry and not very rewarding to check out the growing things.  In general it’s been more a case of survival with less than a 1/4 inch of rain in September and only just now getting a few drops.

We can still count on the annual zinnias, marigolds, and cosmos, but we’re definitely on the light side for flowers right now.  

The Nasturtium in Beth’s raised bed have been putting on quite a show.

Very happy Nasturtium

A couple of the perennials that reliably show up, even with drought are shown below.

Japanese anemone ‘Whirlwind’

Tricyrtis ‘Sinonome’

And a first time plant for us that may or not be perennial is the Cestrum.

Cestrum x ‘Orange Peel’

This flowers all during the growing season in our area.  And it just keeps getting bigger.

There are also some lovely flowers still hanging on the Hydrangea by the back porch.

Hydrangea ‘Limelight’

One of the troughs that I inherited from a member of the Potomac Valley Chapter of the North American Rock Garden Society has a delectable little Sedum growing in it.

Sedum cauticola (?)

I noticed in the alpine bed several flowers on one of the Daphnes, and that seems quite out of season.

Daphne collina x cneorum

Also in the alpine bed the Sculletaria continues to flower, as it has all year long.

Scutellaria resinosa

In the greenhouse itself, there is a marvelous little gloxinia-looking plant from Bolivia.

Seemannia nematanthodes

The color on this little beauty is really remarkable.

And just outside the greenhouse is a little Zephyranthes that has jumped ship into the alpine bed.

Zephyranthes sp. escapee

Speaking of escapees the grass in the orchard has all of a sudden become Japanese stiltgrass.  This is an almost total takeover in one year.  It’s quite beautiful, but definitely invasive.

Japanese stiltgrass

I did mow it after taking pictures.  Ideally one does this before it sets seeds for next year.

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day September 2019

Eastern Swallowtail (Dark Form) on Zinnia

It’s appropriate to feature a zinnia for this Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day post because they are all over the place — in vegetable garden, by the driveway, and in the orchard.  It’s hard to disagree with a flower that comes from seed so easily and lasts all season long.  In fact zinnias were the first flower we planted when we got inspired to start gardening fifty years ago.  We read a book by Jeanne Darlington (Grow Your Own) that led us to scratch a little garden plot next to our student housing.  There have been a lot more flowers since …

Typically we have Dahlias and Glads in the vegetable garden just for picking.

Dahlia ‘Bodacious’

And son Josh planted a lot of wildflowers around the property this spring.

California Poppy reblooming

Including especially zinnias and sage in the orchard, but also this particularly pretty variety of basil.

Basil in flower

My eye tends to get distracted by the perennials, especially those that are giving a bonus rebloom.

Daphne x susannae ‘Tage Lundell’

Delosperma congestum ‘Gold Nugget’

There is also a nice little patch of Colchicum in with the wildflowers in the backyard.

Colchicum ‘Byzantium’

As you walk down the driveway it’s hard not to notice the Viburnum with it’s berries hanging out into the drive.

Viburnum wrightii

In the greenhouse I found the Scilla maderensis budding up a few days ago.

Scilla maderensis

And now the flowers are opening up.

Scilla maderensis opening up

This is also the oxalis time of the year.

Oxalis bowiei

One after another, the Oxalis break into bloom from early September into February.

I’ve also found myself reading up about Zephyranthes and their close relatives Habranthus.  These are both part of the Amaryllis family and they are spectacularly easy to grow.   They are often called rain lilies because the rapid appearance of the flowers in late summer.  I’ve had the yellow forms (like Zephyranthes smalli and Z. jonesi, or Habranthus texensis) for a number of years, but what I’m discovering is that the pink and red forms of the family are really special.

This little Habranthus has white flowers that are tinged pink on the outside.

Habranthus magnoi

And these two Zephyranthes are both of the pink persuasion mixed with white.

Zephyranthes miradorensis

Zephyranthes labuffarosea

This last one is especially large for a Zephyranthes.  It was found in Mexico on a red mountain, therefore it’s name.  Most of the Zephyranthes prefer a southern climate (say zone 8), but they are easy to overwinter in a pot.  They make abundant seeds which will start popping up in other pots if you don’t pay attention.  I’ve got a number of pots that I thought were tritoma or babiana or some other bulb, only to realize that they were actually Zephyranthes volunteering to use an empty pot.

 

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day August 2019

Swallowtail on Tithonia

In the midst of hot days in August it is a reliable pleasure to see butterflies in great abundance throughout the garden.  For this Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day posting let me begin with some shots of the butterflies that are everywhere right now in Maryland.

Female Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Ligularia

Clouded Sulphur on Tithonia

It’s also a good time of year to spot the Hummingbird or Clearwing Moth.  They are very distinctive with almost invisible wings as the flit about the flowers.

Snowberry Clearwing Moth on Buddleia

Here are some of the standard flowers around the yard right now.

Hydrangea ‘Limelight’

Gentiana paradoxa

Allium ‘Millenium’

Sage ‘Black and Blue’

And of course the glads are still blooming in the cutting garden.

Gladiolia ‘Princess Margaret Rose’

New for us in the Cestrum that we added this year.

Cestrum ‘Orange Peel’

And a little more unusual is the diminutive Anemonopsis with it’s waxy flowers.

Anemonopsis macrophylla

We also take advantage of the August flowers in the house as well.

Sunflowers live inside too

And then from the greenhouse

Cyrtanthus elatus x montanus

Lastly let me note a seeding success with these hardy camellia seedlings started from seeds purchased from Camellia Forest.

Camellia oleifera seedlings

These should be interesting to grow outside in Maryland.

Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day July 2019

Deep Red Daylily

Well the middle of July Bloom Day update is always highlighted by lilies, daylilies, and sunflowers.  They are the strength of the season.  We’ve just returned from a vacation and they are the first flowers I see.

Rich Golden Daylily

Light pink Lily

Lily ‘Stargazer’

Lily ‘Scheherazade’

Lily ‘Anastasia’

Anastasia is an Orienpet (cross between Oriental and Trumpet lilies) and it’s one of our favorites but it’s season is nearly done.  Two week ago it was sprawling across the fence row.

Lily ‘Anastasia’ coming into bloom at the end of June

Nearby are the crocosmia that are a long-lasting flower for July.

Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’

Out in the vegetable garden the sunflowers are reaching for the sky.

First Big Sunflower

Hybrid Sunflower

Also from the vegetable garden are the gladiolas that are now part of the inside decor.

Harvesting glads from the garden

A really unusual flower for July comes from the greenhouse.

Haemanthus humilis ssp. humilis

Haemanthus humilis ssp. humilis detail

This is a South African flower that I obtained from the Pacific Bulb Society.

I had this plant growing for 5 years before I got the first flower, but it is delightful.  During the 1-2 month dormant period it does a good imitation of a dead plant, so you have to have some patience.

Outside the world of flowers the redhaven peach is covered with peaches right now

Red-haven peaches

And the Kingbird is in command of the mulberry tree in the mornings.

Kingbird eating mulberries

That’s it for quick look at Ball Rd.  What is blooming in your garden?